Webinar Lifelines and Tohoku Medical Megabank – Research updates of two large Biobank Cohort Studies

Posted by Mihoko Ishii

November 18th      18:00-19:50 (JST) / 10.00-11.50 (Dutch Time)

Tohoku Medical Megabank is organizing a webinar with the Dutch cohort study company Lifelines about their recent outcomes of their collaboration project.

Details and registration via: http://www.tfc.tohoku.ac.jp/event/4254.html.

Please feel free to distribute to your colleagues.


Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this pagePin on Pinterest
Posted in Life Sciences & Health | Comments Off

Japanese Artificial Intelligence in a COVID-19 dominated world.

Nicole Dirksen, Netherlands Innovation Network Tokyo (Innovatie Attaché Netwerk Tokio).

Holland Innovation Network Tokyo (Innovatie Attaché Netwerk Tokio).
October 2020, original published on the RVO site.


A view of the Japanese AI developments during the COVID-19 pandemic and the Japanese vision towards the future.

This article provides an overview of the latest AI developments in Japan. AI plays an important role in several top sectors in Japan and is an essential part of the Japanese Innovation Strategy. The Japanese AI Strategy is part of the Japanese vision of the future, the so called ‘Society 5.0’. Society 5.0 is a society heavily supported by technologies like AI to counter problems like an aging society and natural disasters. Similar to the rest of the world, the Japanese economy has been negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. This can influence the Japanese AI strategy and its three tracks consisting of Productivity, Health and Mobility. Nevertheless, it seems that AI is not just negatively impacted by thepandemic. On the contrary, we see in Japan all kind of innovative AI supported solutions to deal with the new social distancing reality. From robots to VR tourism, this article will show some of the Japanese AI initiatives during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read the full article at: Japanese Artificial Intelligence in a COVID-19 dominated world

This article is part of a rapport about AI in Japan, which will be published later this year.


Source: IA Netwerk Japan

This is a publication of:
Netherlands Enterprise Agency
Prinses Beatrixlaan 2
PO Box 93144 | 2509 AC The Hague
T +31 (0) 88 042 42 42
E klantcontact@rvo.nl
www.rvo.nl


Japanese Artificial Intelligence in a COVID-19 dominated world.

A view of the Japanese AI developments during the COVID-19 pandemic and the Japanese vision towards the future.

By Nicole Dirksen                                                                                                                                                  September 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic leaves a devastating trail through social life and economies all across the world. The pandemics’ impact is accompanied by insecurity about the persistence of the virus. In the current most optimistic pandemic scenario, an effective vaccine will take at least a year to be widely available (OECD, 2020). In other words, we need to adapt to a new reality for at least a year or longer. The new reality has affected the Japanese R&D strategy as well, demanding a response from Japan and resulted in several useful Japanese AI applications, demonstrating their worth during the pandemic. Proving that, while being in the midst of the pandemic, technological developments have not come to a standstill and innovative ideas can thrive during chaotic times. AI in medical areas showed several useful applications to help in the global fight against COVID-19. Another positively affected field within the broad spectrum of possible AI applications is in communication. Remote collaboration tools like Microsoft Teams supported communication in this challenging social distancing reality. Nevertheless, investments and developments in several other fields related to AI have been impacted negatively by the pandemic. This article describes the Japanese AI approach in a new world.

The Japanese AI strategy

The Japanese government has three priority areas as part of the roadmap for AI integration in society. The first is Productivity, focusing on an AI-integrated supply chain, predicting and matching the needs of consumers. One goal is the mass utilization of autonomous robots for a reliable production tailored to consumer demands, to provide the amount they need on the moment they need, aiming for a zero-waste society. The second priority area is Health, Medical care and Welfare. In this future, nursing robots will function as family-like members, providing services and nursing care. One of its goals is to enable designing your own body, replacing body functions by artificial organs and sensors. The third area is the integration of AI in Mobility, which would enable everyone and anything to travel freely, safely and environmentally friendly in the physical and virtual space. From decreasing accidents by autonomous transportation or minimizing the need of transportation altogether, the Japanese government is working towards a future where the cyber and physical space are fused together. Examples of virtual mobility are virtual tourism or virtual office spaces (SCAIT, 2017).

The role of AI in Japan`s Society 5.0

Japan aims to stay a prominent player in the high-tech and consumer electronics sector using Artificial Intelligence as one of its core technologies. Here, AI is defined as: ‘Machines that are able to learn, reason, and act for themselves.’, also known as Artificial Narrow Intelligence (ANI). This ambition is combined with the future society vision of the Japanese government called Society 5.0. Society 5.0 describes a society that is heavily supported by digital technologies, addressing its (current) societal issues, for example the aging society  and natural disasters like flooding, typhoons, landslides, and earthquakes. With AI technology, Society 5.0 wants to meet the specific needs of each individual (Kuczynska, 2019). This vision forms the northern star for Japan`s mid-term to long-term plans, such as the R&D plan, Innovation Strategy and, amongst others, Japan`s AI strategy for the coming 10 years that describes three priority areas to integrate AI in daily life (see text box).

COVID-19 as Inhibitor of AI development

Looking at the negative impact of COVID-19 on the implementation of Japan`s AI strategy, the priority areas Productivity and Mobility can be expected to be affected the most. The current uncertain situation is combined with a near standstill of international trade (in physical goods). Border restrictions and ambiguous supply chains, have huge and lasting negative effects on the global economy, impacting production and consumption.
Although the recent economic forecast of Japan has somewhat improved after lifting the state of emergency at the end of May, gradually increasing socio-economic activities, the current spike of infections could create a setback (Cabinet Office, 2020). The Japanese Cabinet Office announced a 3.4% GDP decrease for the first quarter of the year, a 6% decrease in export, 0.5% decrease of corporate investment and 0.7% decrease of personal consumer investments (Nagata, 2020). The number of employees who were laid off increased by 4.52 million in April to 6.52 million in June (Cabinet Office, 2020).
Looking at the long-term projections, while being a wealthy country, the 6th most competitive country in the world,  and part of the G7, Japan is expected to have a slow economic recovery and projected to reach the 2019 output level once again only by the end of 2024 (EIU, 2020). This could be the largest economic decline since recording began and exceed the 2008 global financial crisis (Keiko, 2020). Although Japan`s neatly planned AI strategy from 2020 to 2030 is developed with relative stable long-term developments in mind, it becomes clear that due to the pandemic the context in which AI will be implemented in Japan has changed.
So how does this impact the Japanese AI market? Firstly, the decrease in corporate and consumer spending’s gives a clue. During a crisis it is likely that luxury goods will be least prioritized by consumers living through a recession in an unstable economy. Related to this are the developments within the Productivity pillar of personalized or ‘luxury’ AI experiences, which are currently relatively expensive for the average consumer. Further developments of AI in personalized systems or AI supporting personalization and ‘tailor made’ consumer goods, could be delayed until the economic situation has somewhat recovered. For example, it is unlikely that we will see the normalization of a non-medical robot butlers affordable for the average consumer within the coming years.

Teleworking in Japan

According to The Japanese Business Federation, 97,8% of its member have instituted teleworking measures this year. This is a remarkable increase compared to the 29,2% in 2019 (Martin, 2020). Despite this increase, it remains important within the Japanese business culture to physically show your work rather than the work output. The homeworking conditions do not inspire either. For example, 99% of the apartments built in Tokyo are less than 100m2 (Inamar, 2020), with an average of 64.5m2 (MILT, 2020). If the pandemic can change the cultural and housing conditions as well, remains to be seen.

Secondly, the Mobility pillar exists of two components: a physical and a virtual part. The automotive sector, key in the physical part of the Mobility pillar, as well as one of the Japanese world-class industrial sectors and Japan’s largest R&D investor (Greimel, 2019) has weakened. The automotive sector’s production and the export of transport equipment has decreased due to COVID-19 (Cabinet Office, 2020). While AI supported self-driving cars did not seem too far out of reach at the beginning of this year, the COVID-19 outbreak has affected investments, developments and interest. In other words, looking at short-term forecasts, the pandemic has negatively affected the transport sector and Mobility pillar of the AI strategy.
However, the crisis has provoked sectors to re-examine their medium-and long-term plans. It is not unlikely that in the long-run COVID-19’s effect on the automotive industry can also inspire AI implementation for data management and autonomous driving technology to support the health and safety of its drivers (PWC, 2020).

Positive impact on AI developments

Although most will think negatively about the impact of COVID-19 on the world’s economy, ICT-related exports from Japan showed growth due to a strong demand for 5G and data centers (Cabinet Office, 2020). The possibilities provided by a broad spectrum of AI technology has increased interests as well. The Japanese government is currently planning to invest its R&D budget faster in the core technologies supporting Society 5.0, among which is AI. If you compare these developments to the AI strategy, it implies that the virtual part of the Mobility pillar, e.g. communication,  and the Health, Medical care and Welfare pillar are stimulated. As the latter will be described in the next paragraph, the virtual mobility and communication aspects of the AI developments are being described here.
The first area of AI integration in society is telework. Despite the support from the government to normalize tele-working to reduce the strain on traffic over the past year, Japanese businesses have been reluctant toward teleworking (see textbox). The pandemic demanded a reinvention of the employees’ home condition to adapt to teleworking, (re) introducing us to several (new) com-munication tools, supporting the ambitions of virtual mobility part of the AI strategy. AI plays a role as an enhancing and translating technology to improve online communication tools. It can for example recognize background noises like a vacuum cleaner and filter this out in the conversation through machine learning (Protalinski, 2020).

Sushi meets AI

Due to the COVID-19 travel restrictions, fish merchants around the world have trouble visiting suppliers of tuna for quality checks. Fortunately, the Japanese Shimura invented a solution for an industry relying on local expertise: The Tuna Scope. A deep learning algorithm collects grading data from merchants and unified a grading standard to ensure high quality fish. The merchant’s smartphone scans a tray of tuna and provides within a few seconds quality results, ensuring delicious sushi.
(Kelly, 2020)

Another development helping the integration of AI in society is the lowering of regulatory hurdles. To maintain social distance, many analog ways of working had to go digital, boosting digital initiatives to be adopted like telemedicine and remote education. The necessity to allow digital alternatives gives potential for AI embedded technology the communication, safety and consumer experiences.

AI Covid-19 solutions

Tourism meets AI

The pandemic has put a halt to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, international tourism and lowered domestic tourism dramatically. The Japanese company Ebilab has developed a service for the city of Ise, providing a virtual reality tour which takes tourists on simulated excursions to the Ise shrine. To make your virtual holiday complete, you can virtually shop at Ise’s souvenir store and interact with employees by web camera.
(Tsukimori, 2020)

In this new world, in which humans need to adapt to a new way of living, AI can provide smart solutions for new problems. This brings us to the second priority area of the AI strategy in Japan: Health, Medical care and Welfare.  AI plays an important part in our fight against COVID-19. By use of AI anomalies can be detected, infection probability can be calculated, inform, personalized content can be  analyzed and false information spread on social media countered. AI can also be used to support economic recovery, monitored by satellites, GPS and social media data. Last but not least, AI plays a fundamental role in our ongoing search for a vaccine by predicting old and new drugs treatments (OECD, 2020). Several of these AI application areas are developed in Japan.

To start with what Japan is best known for: developing auto-nomous robots. Mirai’s newest invention can drive through public spaces like malls or airports to detect people with fever. It then isolates the infected person and, if necessary, startup a tele-conference with a doctor. The AI technology makes the auto-nomous navigation, detection  and interaction possible (European Commission, 2020).  Another COVID-19 countering application comes from Fujitsu that introduced an AI handwashing monitor. It stimulates employees from  health care, hotel and food industries to follow the health ministry’s six-step hand-washing procedure by recognizing complex hand movements, which can even detect if people use soap (The Japanese Times, 2020). A solution for our personal inconvenience when facial recognition technology fails to identify masked faces is provided by Glory Ltd. Its technology is capable of distinguishing faces covered by masks (NIN, 2020). A final glimpse of the first steps in the Society 5.0 perceived future is Tokyo’s robot hotel taking in patients infected with the virus (NOS, 2020). This practical application of AI equipped robots can assist or even replace care workers, especially in situation with a high infection risk.
All these developments show that this pandemic is more than a solely discouraging situation. The chaos has sparked innovative ideas, boosted new creatives initiatives and practical AI solutions  to overcome this global enemy.

This article has been written as part of a broader research report into AI developments in Japan, its market, actors and social impact. The publication of the full report is expected Autumn 2020.

For further inquiries, please contact the Netherlands Innovation Network in Tokyo at:       info@hollandinnovation.jp


References

Cabinet Office. (2020). Recent Economic Developments Monthly Economic Report, June 19 2020. Tokyo: Government of Japan.

EIU. (2020). A Q3 recovery, what Q3 recovery? London: The Economist Intelligence Unit.

European Commission. (2020, March 25). Join the AI-ROBOTICS vs COVID-19 initiative of the European AI Alliance.Retrieved from European Commission: link

Greimel, H. (2019, August 8). Automotive sector tops r&d spending in Japan. Retrieved from Automotive News Europe: link.

Inamar, N. (2020, April 16). Why Can’t Japan Work From Home? Retrieved from Izanau : link

Keiko, T. (2020, May 20). Worst yet to come for Japanese economy. Retrieved from NHK World-Japan: link

Kelly, T. (2020, July 7). Sushi meets AI: Japanese inventor’s app scopes out choice tuna cuts. Retrieved from The Japan Times: link

Kuczynska, A. (2019). Analysis of opportunities for EU SMEs in Japan’s Data Economy and Artificial Intelligence in connection with Robotics. Tokyo: EU-Japan Centre for Industrial Cooperation.

Martin, A. (2020, May 23). Remote possibilities: Can every home in Japan become an office? Retrieved from The Japanese Times: link

Miki, R. (2020, May 13). Coronavirus pushes Japan closer to high-tech ‘super cities’. Retrieved from Nikkei Asian Review: link

MILT. (2020, July 24). 2018 Housing Economic Data. Retrieved from Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism: link

Nagata, K. (2020, May 14). Coronavirus might cost Japan over 1 million jobs, economists say. Retrieved from The Japan Times : link

NIN. (2020, May 8). Corona Newsletter. The Hague, Netherlands.

NOS. (2020, May 1). Japan opent robothotels voor coronapatienten. Retrieved from NOS: link

OECD. (2020). Treatments and a vaccine for COVID-19: the need for coordinating policies on R&D, manufacturing and access . Paris: OECD.

OECD. (2020). Using artificial intelligence to help combat COVID-19. Paris: OECD.

Protalinski, E. (2020, April 9). How Microsoft Teams will use AI to filter out typing, barking , and other noise fro video calls. Retrieved from Venture Beat: link

PWC. (2020, July 24). COVID-19 actions in the Automotive industry. Retrieved from PWC Japan: link

SCAIT. (2017). Artificial Intteligence Technolgoy Strategy. Tokyo: Strategic Council for AI Technology.

The Japanese Times. (2020, June 20). Fujitsu brings hand-washing AI to COVID-19 fight in Japan. Retrieved from The Japanese Times: link

Tsukimori, O. (2020, July 6). Japan restaurateur looks to AI-based management to stay ahead of curve in virus-battered industry. Retrieved from The Japanese Times: link

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this pagePin on Pinterest
Posted in Artificial Intelligence, Innovation in general, Life Sciences & Health | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off

Hydrogen Policy Webinar 19 October 2020


Netherlands Hydrogen Digital Innovation Mission to Japan

12 – 23 October 2020

Policy Webinar

19 October 2020  8:30-10:00 Netherlands local time         15:30-17:00 Japanese local time

NL time JP time Contents Speaker
8:30 15:30 Opening Embassy
8:35 15:35 Promotional video H2 NL -
8:40 15:40 NL presentation EZK, Mr. Han Feenstra                                                                     (CONFIRMED)
8:50 15:50 JP presentation (TBC) METI, Ministry of Economy Trade and Industry        (CONFIRMED)
9:00 16:00 NL presentation TKI-New Gas                                                                                       (CONFIRMED)

Mr. Jorg Gigler

Director

9:10 16:10 JP presentation Ministry of Environment of Japan                                              (CONFIRMED)

Mr. Naoto Otani

Chief of hydrogen

Climate Change Projects Office, Climate Change Policy Division, Global environment Bureau

9:20 16:20 NL presentation City of Groningen                                                                             (CONFIRMED)

Mr. Paul de Rook

Vice Mayor

9:30 16:30 JP presentation City of Kawasaki, Mr. Tetsuya Majima                                      (CONFIRMED)
9:40 16:40 NL presentation City of Rotterdam                                                                            (CONFIRMED)

Mr. Lieuwe Brouwer

Advisor Energy Transition

9:50 16:50 Q&A (Chat)
10:00 17:00 Closing Embassy
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this pagePin on Pinterest
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off

Online Mission Life Science & Health Japan

Mihoko Ishii, Netherlands Innovation Network Tokyo (Innovatie Attaché Netwerk Tokio).

Online Mission Life Science & Health Japan

25 September – 16 October 2020

Are you active in the Life Science & Health sector and do you have interest in Japan on this theme ? From 25 September to 16 October, the Netherlands Embassy in Tokyo and Task Force Health Care are jointly organizing an Online Mission Life Science & Health Japan. You will have the opportunity to join in several existing expo’s and meet business partners through their partnering systems. Please see here for more details.

Planned schedule:

September 25         Preparatory and Kick-off meeting

September 28-30    Biotech & Pharma Virtual Partnering Conference Osaka 2020

October 12-13         3rd Well Aging Society Summit Asia-Japan (WASS)

October 14-16         BioJapan 2020 & healthTECH Japan 2020

                                                               & Renegerative Medicine Japan 2020

We hope to see you digitally in Japan!


Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this pagePin on Pinterest
Posted in Life Sciences & Health | Comments Off

AI in Mobility: Japan, Building a strong case for tomorrow

Mihoko Ishii, Holland Innovation Network Tokyo (Innovatie Attaché Netwerk Tokio).
May 2019, original published on the RVO site.

3377_Cover_AI Magazine_Mobility2

Please click the picture for the pdf-vesion. Japan article is page 36-39.

Japan: Building a strong case for tomorrow
March 2020

In 2019, the Japanese government published two key policy papers: an Integrated Innovation Strategy, and related AI Strategy, which identified the technology areas that will largely define the new automotive era as Connected, Automated, Shared and Electric (CASE).

Continue reading

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this pagePin on Pinterest
Posted in Life Sciences & Health | Comments Off

Tailor made visit to international guests @Intertraffic Amsterdam 21-24 April

Mihoko Ishii, Netherlands Innovation Network Tokyo (Innovatie Attaché Netwerk Tokio).

Invitation to Intertraffic Amsterdam by Smart Mobility Embassy

21-24 April, RAI Amsterdam

Since the establishment of the Smart Mobility Embassy in 2017, we have received numerous international delegations, organized study trips and have been represented at various events. Together with our triple helix network of 63 parties in the Netherlands, we exchange smart mobility knowledge and experiences with other countries. As the Smart Mobility Embassy we are available to answer questions about smart mobility challenges, opportunities and solutions. Thanks to our extensive network, we can put you in touch with the right parties/experts in the Netherlands. Our goal is to create a better environment worldwide through safe, efficient and sustainable mobility. We can only achieve this through cooperation. Therefore we invite you to explore the possibilities for collaboration at Intertraffic in Amsterdam that will take place from 21 to 24 April this year.

Smart Mobility Embassy invites international delegates to:
– Tailor-made exhibition visits
– Session at Intertraffic Summit “Societal impact of smart mobility in Dutch cities” 21 April 11.00-11.45

Contact: Mieke Masselink, Smart Mobility Embassy

See more details:  Intertraffic Invitation (EN)


Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this pagePin on Pinterest
Posted in Energy, Hightech Systems and Materials, ICT, Logistics | Tagged , , | Comments Off

Grootste Japanse publieke kennisinstituut verwelkomt meer samenwerking met Nederland

Rob Stroeks, Holland Innovation Network Tokyo (Innovatie Attaché Netwerk Tokio).

14 januari 2020

Op 14 januari bracht IA-Tokio samen met ambassadeur Peter van der Vliet een bezoek aan president Dr. Ryoji Chubachi van AIST, de Japanse tegenhanger van ons TNO.

Dr. Chubachi nodigde ons land uit voor verdere samenwerking met AIST op verschillende gebieden, waaronder waterstof en windenergie. Hij haalde ook de samenwerking aan met Eindhoven High Tech Campus, met wie AIST in 2017 een overeenkomst afsloot. Ambassadeur Van der Vliet onderstreepte het belang van bilaterale samenwerking, en bood verdere ondersteuning aan bij het realiseren hiervan.

IMG_04461

Continue reading

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this pagePin on Pinterest
Posted in Energy, Hightech Systems and Materials | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Belangrijke Japanse medische prijs voor Professor Hans Clevers

Rob Stroeks, Holland Innovation Network Tokyo (Innovatie Attaché Netwerk Tokio).

20 december 2019

Op 19 december ontving prof. Hans Clevers van het Hubrecht Institute in Utrecht de Keio Medical Prize, een van de belangrijkste Japanse prijzen ogv de medische wetenschap. De uitreiking vond plaats op Keio University, in bijzijn van 300 genodigden, waaronder de Japanse viceminister voor wetenschap, Ambassadeur Peter van der Vliet en Prof. Toshiro Sato van Keio University. Met deze laatste werkte Clevers lang samen in baanbrekende experimenten voor stamcellen en groeisystemen van menselijke mini-organen in het lab, ook wel bekend als organoids.

IMG_03382

Keio Universiteit is een Europees georiënteerde universiteit die in 1858 is opgericht in de tijd dat westerse kennis alleen via Nederland het land binnenkwam.


Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this pagePin on Pinterest
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off

Oproep: deelname aan de innovatie parade op TeamNL Tokio Expo, 1 juni -10 juli 2020

Sonoko Takahashi, Netherlands Innovation Network Tokyo (Innovatie Attaché Netwerk Tokio)

Interesse in contacten leggen in de Japanse markt?

Volgend jaar worden de Olympische Spelen in Tokio gehouden. In aanloop daarnaar toe (1 juni-10 juli) zal Nederland zich presenteren in de Expo van het TeamNL Tokio Centre in Tokio. Dit wordt georganiseerd door de RVO en het Ministerie van Buitenlandse Zaken, i.s.m. NOC-NSF, Papendal en de Nederlandse ambassade in Tokio. Eén van de activiteiten zal een innovatie parade worden, waar producten, processen en diensten worden getoond die tot stand zijn gekomen in een samenwerking tussen Nederland en Japan.

Bent u geïnteresseerd en wilt u meer informatie? Registreer uzelf dan voor 20 januari 2020 via deze link. Wij nemen dan contact met u op!

IP Atmosphere_1<Impressie van de innovatie parade in Parijs>


Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this pagePin on Pinterest
Posted in Netherlands Innovation Network Tokyo Activities | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off

RVO kent subsidie toe aan Nederlandse Paviljoen op Waterstofbeurs in Tokio, 26-28 februari 2020

Rob Stroeks, Holland Innovation Network Tokyo (Innovatie Attaché Netwerk Tokio).
3 december 2019

Goed nieuws: De Rijksdienst voor Ondernemend Nederland (RVO.nl) heeft subsidie toegekend voor het Nederlandse Paviljoen op de H2 en FC Expo die van 26 tot en met 28 februari 2020 in Tokio plaatsvindt. Op dit moment nemen twaalf bedrijven deel aan het Paviljoen waarmee Nederland zich presenteert op een van de belangrijkste en grootste vakbeurzen op dit gebied. Dit artikel geeft informatie over de huidige deelnemers, wat u kunt verwachten als deelnemer en een concept programma.

Bent u geinteresseerd? Inschrijving is nog mogelijk!

Hydrogen and FC Expo 2019

Continue reading

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this pagePin on Pinterest
Posted in Energy, Hightech Systems and Materials, Netherlands Innovation Network Tokyo Activities | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off